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"Capitolism - The Normalization of Political Violence in the United States""Capitolism - The Normalization of Political Violence in the United States"

 

 

 

Alán Carrasco "jus ad bellum"Alán Carrasco "jus ad bellum"

Alán Carrasco    jus ad bellum

2021

printed tablecloth on Panama fabric, edition of 3 + 1AP

approx. 90.5 by 55 in. (ca. 230 by 139,7 cm)

 

Jus ad bellum is a neologism written in Latin form that means “right to war”. Its use, especially widespread after World War II, refers to the field of law that determines what are the "legitimate" reasons for a state to start (or justify, in any case) a war. Carrasco’s jus ad bellum shows all the nation-state entities in which the United States currently has military personnel deployed. A map that, although it obviously does not show all the countries, gives us a glimpse of a sufficiently large amount to understand a global geopolitical strategy of US interference. Calculating the magnitude of this US military presence is a practically impossible task, since the information provided by the Department of Defense is incomplete and full of irregularities. Apart from the secret locations, the complexity of the calculation also lies in the divergence of types of military installations, from the smallest with just a few attachés, to the huge bases of Germany (40,000 troops in 179 military installations), Japan (somewhat more 50,000 troops in 109 bases) or South Korea (28,000 troops in 85 bases), countries invaded and occupied since World War II and the Korean War respectively. But, regardless of the precise location of all of them, through the reports of the Department of Defense (DoD) and its Defense Manpower Data Center (DMDC), as well as the book “ Base Nation: How US Military Bases Abroad Harm America and the World ” by David Vine, associate professor of anthropology at the American University, we can confirm that the US has 686 effective military bases deployed in 74 foreign countries, assuming the largest military deployment in peacetime in history and a very clear violation to the sovereignty of the rest of the nations.

- Alán Carrasco

 

As per the artist's instructions, and if the current pandemic situation would have allowed it, Carrasco's artwork was to be used as a tablecloth for the catering table during the opening of the exhibition, and displayed afterwards with the wine stains.

 

 

 

Willie Cole "Gas Snake Studies"Willie Cole "Gas Snake Studies"

Willie Cole    Gas Snake Studies

1995

Polaroid photograph and felt-tip ink marker on watercolor paper,

three individual studies collaged on paper, framed together

unique works and the only ones created by the artist

approx. 12 by 16.4 in. (ca. 30 by 42 cm)

 

illustrated page 38 in the publication "Complex Conversations: Willie Cole Sculptures And Small Works",

published by the Gwen Frostic School of Art at Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI, 2012

 

 

 

Derek Cracco "God Save The USA"Derek Cracco "God Save The USA"

Derek Cracco    God Save The U.S.A.

2019

vinyl, glitter, lapel pin, and resin on wooden panel

approx. 46 by 34 in. (ca. 118,8 by 86,4 cm)

 

 

Derek Cracco "God Save The USA" (detail)Derek Cracco "God Save The USA" (detail)

Derek Cracco    God Save The U.S.A.   (detail)

2019

vinyl, glitter, lapel pin, and resin on wooden panel

 

 

 

Erin Fostel "Canton/Wanton"Erin Fostel "Canton/Wanton"

Erin Fostel    Canton / Wanton

2021

charcoal and graphite on Rives BFK paper

approx. 5.75 by 8.6 in. (ca. 14,6 by 21,75 cm)

 

private collection Washington, DC

 

 

 

Florian Heinke "Riots #48"Florian Heinke "Riots #48"

Florian Heinke    Riots #48

2011

acrylic on canvas

approx. 11.8 by 15.75 in. (ca. 30 by 40 cm)

 

private collection Birmingham, AL

 

 

 

Darius Hill "The Revolution Will Not Be Televised"Darius Hill "The Revolution Will Not Be Televised"

Darius Hill    The Revolution Will Not Be Televised

2006

acrylic, acrylic medium, graphite, marker, and paper collage on paper

approx. 59 by 42 in. (ca. 149,8 by 106,7 cm)

 

private collection Birmingham, AL

 

 

Darius Hill "The Revolution Will Not Be Televised" (detail)Darius Hill "The Revolution Will Not Be Televised" (detail)

Darius Hill    The Revolution Will Not Be Televised   (detail)

2006

acrylic, acrylic medium, graphite, marker, and paper collage on paper

 

 

 

Mathias Kessler "Disasters of War XXX (After Goya)"Mathias Kessler "Disasters of War XXX (After Goya)" Mathias Kessler "Disasters of War XXXI (After Goya)"Mathias Kessler "Disasters of War XXXI (After Goya)"
   

Mathias Kessler

Disasters of War XXX (After Goya)          Disasters of War XXXI (After Goya)

2021

unique (edition of one), this work is comprised of two individually framed elements

laser cutter burned bitmap image into graphic paper

each approx. 13.4 by 21.25 in. (ca. 35 by 54 cm)

 

 

 

Dawn Kramlich "Language of the Oppressor"Dawn Kramlich "Language of the Oppressor"

Dawn Kramlich    Language of the Oppressor

2020

encaustic and sharpie on wooden panel

approx. 18 by 24 in. (ca. 45,7 by 61 cm)

 

 

Language of the Oppressor utilizes text as object, subject, and semiotic sign and signifier. The text reads "useless conjecture" and is a direct response to the flippant neglect of the Republican party in its denial that white supremacy has existed and is homegrown terrorism.

- Dawn Kramlich

 

 

 

Sonja Rieger "KKK Rally, October 20, 1979, 7pm, Gardendale, Alabama", one of only two existing vintage silver gelatin printsSonja Rieger "KKK Rally, October 20, 1979, 7pm, Gardendale, Alabama", one of only two existing vintage silver gelatin prints

Sonja Rieger "KKK Rally, October 20, 1979, 7pm, Gardendale, Alabama", one of only two existing vintage silver gelatin printsSonja Rieger "KKK Rally, October 20, 1979, 7pm, Gardendale, Alabama", one of only two existing vintage silver gelatin prints

Sonja Rieger    (KKK) Rally, October 20, 1979, Gardendale, Alabama

1979/1980

unique (edition of one), this work is comprised of two individually framed photographs,

silver gelatin print on Agfa Brovira paper

each approx. 5.9 by 8.6 in. (ca. 15 by 22 cm)

In 1979, photographer Sonja Rieger had just moved from New Jersey to begin teaching at UAB when she took these photographs at a Klan rally in Gardendale, Alabama. Rieger’s stunning images leave us to wonder precisely who is being warned here. Although one Klansman in the central photo offers a menacing glance directly at the camera, he doesn’t know he’s just a few years away from the Southern Poverty Law Center’s landmark lawsuit that bankrupted the Klan;  less than five years from Jesse Jackson’s galvanizing address to the Democratic National Convention; six years from Michael Jackson taking over pop music; and only a generation away from America’s first Black president. Nonetheless, although the subjects of these photos are, culturally speaking, galaxies away from us now, Rieger momentarily convinces us that the distance is actually about ten feet across the room.

These photographs have only been shown once before.

 

 

 

Bayeté Ross Smith "Taking Aim"Bayeté Ross Smith "Taking Aim"

Bayeté Ross Smith    Taking Aim (Triple Shot)

2010

inkjet print on paper, unframed,

approx. 48 by 71.5 in. (ca. 122 by 181,6 cm)

 

 

Taking Aim raises the question: who is considered a victim, and who is considered a threat? Furthermore, how does the perception of Victim or Threat increase or decrease the likelihood of someone becoming involved in interpersonal violence. Taking Aim also examines our cultural relationship to violence, the fine line that exists between acceptable, condoned, recreational, and deplorable criminal violence. This dichotomy exists throughout popular culture, from television, music, and movies, as well as history, in terms of wars, massacres, and assassinations are considered justified, whereas similar types of historic events are considered atrocities.

- Bayeté Ross Smith

 

 

 

Travis Somerville "Presidential Suite"Travis Somerville "Presidential Suite"

Travis Somerville    Presidential Suite

2016 - 2017

portraits of the first 45 US Presidents - graphite on paper, vintage rifle targets, 99 individual elements

as installed approx. 84 by 160 in. (ca. 213,4 by 406,4 cm)

Travis Somerville "Presidentail Suite", 2016-2017, graphite on paper and practice targets, 99 individual elements (detail)Travis Somerville "Presidentail Suite", 2016-2017, graphite on paper and practice targets, 99 individual elements (detail)

Travis Somerville    Presidential Suite   (detail)

2016 - 2017

portraits of the first 45 US Presidents - graphite on paper, vintage rifle targets, 99 individual elements

Travis Somerville "Presidentail Suite", 2016-2017, graphite on paper and practice targets, 99 individual elements (detail)Travis Somerville "Presidentail Suite", 2016-2017, graphite on paper and practice targets, 99 individual elements (detail)

Travis Somerville    Presidential Suite   (detail)

2016 - 2017

portraits of the first 45 US Presidents - graphite on paper, vintage rifle targets, 99 individual elements

Travis Somerville "Presidentail Suite", 2016-2017, graphite on paper and practice targets, 99 individual elements (detail)Travis Somerville "Presidentail Suite", 2016-2017, graphite on paper and practice targets, 99 individual elements (detail)

Travis Somerville    Presidential Suite   (detail)

2016 - 2017

portraits of the first 45 US Presidents - graphite on paper, vintage rifle targets, 99 individual elements

 

 

 

Catherine Tafur "The Supporter"Catherine Tafur "The Supporter"

Catherine Tafur    The Supporter

2017

archival ink (Sakura Pigma Micron Pen) on paper

14 by 11 in. (ca. 35,6 by 27,9 cm)

 

 

 

Catherine Tafur "Bald Eagle"Catherine Tafur "Bald Eagle"

Catherine Tafur    Bald Eagle

2017

archival ink (Sakura Pigma Micron Pen) on paper

12 by 12 in. (ca. 30,5 by 30,5 cm)

 

 

 

Catherine Tafur "Plague"Catherine Tafur "Plague"

Catherine Tafur    Plague

2017

archival ink (Sakura Pigma Micron Pen) on paper

10 by 8 in. (ca. 25,4 by 20,3 cm)

 

 

 

Catherine Tafur "Madman"Catherine Tafur "Madman"

Catherine Tafur    Madman

2017

archival ink (Sakura Pigma Micron Pen) and aluminum foil on paper

12 by 12 in. (ca. 30,5 by 30,5 cm)

 

 

 

Catherine Tafur "Grab 'em by the pussy"Catherine Tafur "Grab 'em by the pussy"

Catherine Tafur    Grab 'em by the pussy

2017

archival ink (Sakura Pigma Micron Pen) on paper

10 by 8 in. (ca. 25,4 by 20,3 cm)

 

 

 

Catherine Tafur "NYPD"Catherine Tafur "NYPD"

Catherine Tafur    NYPD

2015

archival ink (Sakura Pigma Micron Pen) on paper

9 by 9 in. (ca. 22,9 by 22,9 cm)

 

 

 

Melissa Vandenberg "Polycephalic Patriot"Melissa Vandenberg "Polycephalic Patriot"

Melissa Vandenberg    Polycephalic Patriot

2013

US flag, polyester, thread

coiled dimensions (as shown in image) approx. 18 by 30 by 28 in., extended approx. 10 ft long

Melissa Vandenberg "Polycephalic Patriot" (detail)Melissa Vandenberg "Polycephalic Patriot" (detail)

Melissa Vandenberg    Polycephalic Patriot   (detail)

2013

US flag, polyester, thread

 

 

 

Melissa Vandenberg "Flag Study"Melissa Vandenberg "Flag Study"

Melissa Vandenberg    Untitled (Flag Study)

2009

incised paper, finger w/ ink pints on folded paper

approx. 16 by 20 in. (ca. 40,6 by 50,8 cm)

 

 

 

Melissa Vandenberg "EX*PAT*RIOT"Melissa Vandenberg "EX*PAT*RIOT"

Melissa Vandenberg    EX * PAT * RIOT

2016

match burns on Arches paper

approx. 27.5 by 29.5 in. (ca. 70 by 75 cm)

 

 

 

 

 

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